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at two of the three candidates. colin gallagher again, not mervyn conlan, and joyce lewis. is mervin conlan here? >> i have been a member of board two for about four or five years. this is mostly due for medical reasons which have been resolved. we have found working on the board educational. given my background as a real estate broker, given the threat of my experience for single- family condominiums to fairly heavy-duty commercial. this was a surprise, the education received on this board. mr. campana was raised in hunters point, i will have to introduce myself to him. i have a real estate background and experience from this board. thank you. >> thank you. >> our next applicant is joyce lewis. >> good afternoon. my name is joyce lewis. this is my second appearance before the rules committee. i made a presentation about three or four months ago. i was motivated to apply for the sport after attending a women's league conference which focus on commission appointments in san francisco and board appointments. this conference was held to encourage women to get involved in civic activitie
was at that neighborhood meeting along with duncan, the captain, officer gallagher, the permit officer for no. station, a couple of officers from the alcohol licensing unit, and a couple of other officers, and actually, note the it -- actually, the executive director jocelyn kane was at that meeting. they want to open a bona fide restaurant and have a lounge after the food. we do have an abc condition, which calls for food operations wherever they are open until 2:00 a.m. for the meal service to go until 1:30, and it is our intention to always serve food when we are open, up to 30 minutes before we close. this will be a normal restaurant. anyone who is at the meeting, ms. kane can tell you, the food was a bit late getting out, but it was great, very good food. the concept is $8 to $12 per small plate, and i would request that there be a conditional grant. also, we have some conditions for haute officer gallagher. if you have any questions, we're here to answer. president newlin: commissioners, questions? commissioner joseph? vice chair joseph: do you have an idea to advertise your venue? >> i do not b
. trace gallagher is in our west coast newsroom. trace? >> reporter: using beanbags is not an across-the-board policy. these agents are armed with several weapons, some lethal, some not. and the orders are given on a case-by-case basis. these border patrol agents were told to use nonlethal force. the question is -- why? court records show that they knew that these suspected illegals were carrying rifles. they expected this group of cartel enforcers that had robbed, raped and assaulted other illegals. they knew they were dangerous and yet they fired beanbags against what turned out to be semiautomatic weapons. when called the border patrol. they said the f.b.i. is handling it. the f.b.i. said they're not commenting because it's an ongoing investigation. five suspects, as you know, were arrested. could this day, 10 weeks later, not a single suspect has been charged. brian terry's mom told william lajeunesse that there were eight suspects. >> the eight came down the trail. >> reporter: bandits with ak-47s and one of those traced back to a gun store in phoenix. the feds were notified abo
for mr. gallagher. >> i believe that you have submitted one but i don't think that i have one in my pack it. >> i believe that you have submitted form 700. this is on my 2009 until last year. the hearing and decision was back on may 4th. there was an agreement to grant at least a reduction. i'm still waiting for the check. i would follow the law impartially. thank you. >> is there any public comment on this item? >> my name is richard lee. >> this is a very demanding role today. i stood here in 2003 and it feels like i have been through board two, board 1. coming back this year for another reappointment, i am just preparing myself and preparing the new applicants. that is my 8 impartial, -- comment. i have enjoyed working with them. he does not have the experience. thank you for your service. >> is to any public comment at this time? public comment is now closed. >> the members of the public cannot hear you until you're at the microphone. >> thank you. >> ok, thank you. >> colleagues. >> we have seats 3 and 7 and we have three applicants for those seats. >> i am open to reappointing mr.
. host: we are here to talk about the defense of marriage act. we have two guests ,maggie gallagher and brian moulton. how significant is the decision that the president will not to defend the marriage act? guest: we thought we would get someone in the courtroom trying to win these cases. president obama has declined to defend the law, in part because he is losing these lower court cases, because he is not bringing the best evidence into court. we have been strategizing behind the scenes on how to get someone into court that can intervene. president obama made our job a lot easier. host: the national a court -- organization for marriage is against gay marriage. it was not a suspect -- a setback when the obama administration said it will not keep defending? guest: if they are unable to repeal the defense of marriage act by going to congress, it is unilaterally declared that these laws are not defensible. we were appalled by that. on the other hand, it was good news for us, because we recognize the obama administration is not seriously trying to win these cases. host: here is one comm
and an end to a 27-year career. andy gallagher reports. >> discovery traveling 440 miles an hour. altitude four miles. >> gliding gently back to earth, this was discovery's final approach. the end of its final mission. after almost 30 years of service, 6,000 trips around our planet and a total of a year in space, it was time to call it a day. >> and the shuttle being rotated toward the flight deck. >> discovery delivered more supplies and equipment to the international space station. but soon, this iconic craft will be heading to a museum to live out its dates as a symbol of the shuttle program. it's a fitting tribute for one of the space agency's most accomplished ships. for many, this marked the beginning of the end. >> ignition. and we have liftoff. liftoff. >> for now, only two missions left before the entire fleet is retired for good. after that, america will have to rely on other nations for space travel. the first time that's happened in 6 0 years. andy gallagher, bbc news, florida. >> we say farewell, discovery. >> if you want to see it, the place to go is washington, d.c.'s smiths
assistant managing editoror orne" mazine lea gallagher. >> andalso, willie geist. >> sweet oy. bereeauh into the news. >> what he's talking abt w. >>ou're worrd aboutnet's position. newt was, of course, for invading libya before barack obama invaded libya. and now that he has, he's against it. >> oh, right! >> he was for it before he was against it. >> it's whatever he can use to make some -- >> don't be so cynical. mike barnicle, seemed like a good idea until obama did it, now it just makes no sense at all. >> that's what i was going to m working overtime with newt. we have a couple clips portraying just exactly what you pointed out, joe. three weeks ago he's for doing exactly what president obama did and all of a sudden innocent last three days he's opposed everything president obama has done. >> can i pretend to disagree? >> yes. >> try. >> you can. give it a try. >> he was for intervention, then he thought it was too late and he didn't like the way it was executed in a multilateral way. if you're going for newt inconsistencies and hypocrisies, this one doesn't move the needle for me
. host: human rights campaign is a proponent of gay marriage. matthew gallagher, you were shaking your head. guest: if you go back and read the report, the rationale of the law, the one that is most important, he is misdescribing, saying what he thinks about gay people, is that marriage is about responsible " creation. we have an interest in bringing mothers and fathers together to raise their children in the same family. the majority of courts as well as the majority of people have recognized that this is in fact the rational basis for our marriage laws. for the obama administration to go back and exercise a line- item veto and refuse to head knowledge that is the purpose of the law as it was laid out is just another example of its, i think, irresponsibility on the issue. its job is to execute and even the laws. the idea that marriage is not defensible as a union between has been a life is i think irresponsible. host: let's look at the statement that attorney general eric holder has put out. : here is a comme what is the statute in some cases? [inaudible] guest: the portion that defin
. >> gallagher and other comedians known for smashing water melons is holding a sale. he has been evicked from his home in california. but he has lots of memorabilia to sell. the comedian was one of the biggest acts back in the 1980s bringing his watermelon smashing performance to audiences. but these days the audiences are smaller and his three decade long comedy grind has come to a toll on the 64 -year-old e says the mortgage lender kicked him out for of his home for -- he says the mortgage lender kicked him out of his home for 30 years. >>> emotion can get the best of people and it did in houston this week. the man who had enough of one protest and the trip he took with an officer second later. -- seconds later. >>> title 9 helped to end discrimination based on race, color and gender of a national origin, now how it's helping heat a fire over girls sports at a high school. >>> an unruly protester was led away by police at a rally in houston after an outburst. it was caught on tape. >> you are not being cordial. >> a tea party activists got right up in a speaker's face with a camera. after a
the giants uniform before them, from willie mays to allah gallagher, to william a covey, will clark, body and barry bonds, jimmy davenport, gaylord perry, from marishow to murph, and on and on. they all fought for this for 52 years and you brought it home for them. thank you. and how many of you out there remember going to giants games at candlestick park in the 1960's, 1970's, 1980's, 1990's? what this 2010 giants team did, what it accomplished pays tribute to more than 90 million of us who passed through the turnstiles at field stadium, candlestick park, and of at&t park in the past 53 years, leading with your hearts, wearing your, coming with your infants and grandchildren, booin g the dodgers, shared experiences of fathers and sons, mothers and daughters, this 2010 giants team, well, you brought it home all for us, too. thank you all so much. i was one of them taking the bus with my father out to candlestick. i am sure all of you have your stories of candlestick. some of you, even of field stadium. now we take our children and share experiences, my wife, bringing it all home full circ
for one of our women's seeds. >> i actually have. thank you. >> my name is john gallagher, and i work for the city and county of san francisco. in the veteran's claim representative. we see on average 400 to 500 veterans per month. we are just down the street, and we do out reached three days a week at the va hospital -- we do outreach three days a week. we are also at the downtown va clinic, so we are a small group of three employees imbedded into the community. no matter where i go in the community, i keep hearing eddie's name. it is either from us sending veterans to him, or vice versa where he is entrusting with veterans sending them to our office. he is a huge asset in terms of with the commission is headed. one of the skills he has said he did not mention as he was up here is that he used to work for the federal government and used to actually help veterans to write federal reserve's. one of the goals is to help unemployed veterans become employed better is. -- help veterans to write federal resumes. he takes hours out of his weekends to help veterans write better resumes. he is
the classification of the homemaker and typewriter repair. we also consolidated our management series so we gallagher have these single incumbent classifications. we have been consolidating that way. for layoff purpose, it can be -- it can increase the job of discussion because the likelihood an employee in one department with a job title -- the likelihood they will not be a good fit in a different department with different operations increases if you have a very broad scope of duties within that job. we have to balance the interest in reducing the number of classifications against the interest of making sure it actually reflects would take you through the job. a person if they move departments will be successful in a different department. supervisor chu: if i can ask the department to get through the remaining slides quickly. >> slide 12 deals with health care and pension. we just had a very long hearing on that, so i can skip through that. i would just like to point out that while the cost-benefits are rising, the benefits for active employees for health care, those benefits are not out of black or
. efforts to cool down overheating fuel rods are temporarily put on hold. trace gallagher has more live from our west coast newsroom. trace? >> reporter: this is a dangerous mixed bag. power cords have been attached to all six of the reactors, which is not to say that power is going to them, which is not the case. there is power to reactors 1 and 2. we've seen smoke rising from number 2. it's unclear if it's coming from the reactor itself or the spent fuel rods. the numbers 5 and 6 appear to be the least troubled. so those, apparently, are stable. the big problems are at reactors 3 and 4. smoke seen rising from number 3. they've evacuated all workers. they're not clear if it's come from the reactor itself, but the fear is, the pressure is rising that steam is coming out. remember, number 3 is the only one that uses plutonium. that is much more toxic than uranium. and the concern is, because the containment shell is damaged that you would have that radioactive material, very dangerous, spewing into the atmosphere. we're also learning that 10 days before the quake and before the tsunami, tokyo
gallagher joining me live. good morning. and tell me a little bit about what kind of a -- what kind of a turnout do you expect? >> normally, a little crowd before mass and the crowd comes in at midday. so we are five deep by 2 p.m. until close so it should be good. >> reporter: what kind of -- what neighed you decide you wanted -- made you decide to have donations for the earthquake victims. >> patrick, the owner, gives back to the local charities every year. this time e. decided that this -- this time, he decided thisthis was a great charity, the american red cross and decided this was the one this year. there you go. >> reporter: okay. so, and you are famous for your guinness. >> guinness shepard's pie and fish and chips is all going to be flowing, and corned beef all flowing. >> reporter: thank you so much. can't wait. now if you one of those that enjoy the green beer and guinness, make sure to be responsible and don't drink and drive. reporting live, sherrie johnson, abc2 news. >> to her point, tipsy taxi will be made available to make sure you don't get behind the wheel if you
,000 nearby residents locked down inside their homes right now. trace gallagher has more live from our west coast newsroom. trace? >> reporter: as a backdrop, the japanese government is being criticized for getting information out to the people too slowly. they're blaming the tokyo energy and power company from getting information to slowly to them. and in context, they've been known for misleading statements in the past. here's the facts, as we know them at this minute. the reactors at fukushima, we're concerned about mainly two of them. the number 2 reactor and number 4 reactor. let's begin with number 2. the pressure there is said to be falling and radiation level rising. that's a sign, experts say, that the containment shell might be breached. on top of that, the fuel rods in number 2 are fully exposed. the pool that stores the rods is boiling. if it boils enough and evaporates, it means more radioactive material will be spewed into the air. on to number 4, this is where that fire continues to burn. they're fighting that fire. the containment shell on number four confirmed has been brea
a look at governors and the white house and a showdown. also a conversation with nancy gallagher, the board chair of the national organization for marriage. and brian walton with human rights campaign to talk about the issue of gay marriage and the decision by the obama administration on the domestic marriage act. that's tomorrow morning. some of the topics on "washington journal" heard here on c-span and c-span radio. enjoy the rest of your weekend and hope you have a great week ahead. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> welcome to "news makers." we have a budget and appropriations reportser with the national journal. julie has the first question. >> hi, mr. chairman. good to be with you. i wanted to ask the vice president, vice president biden, went to the hill to jump start talks on how to fund the government through the end of the year, just backed by president obama. you were in that meeting. i wonder, did you expect to be invited? does that tell you anything about the pace or the tenor of the negotiations going on right now? >> well, i'm glad the pre
this is news to them. trace gallagher has the latest from our west coast newsroom. what? >> reporter: we just talked to a family spokesperson for the maraachlis and said they will release a statement. we assume that will come with a decision as well. the hospital has agreed to send baby joseph home. they will transfer baby joseph with the breathing machine, but when he arrives at home, they will place him in his parents' arms and remove that breathing machine and they will not give joseph the tracheotomy his family has asked for, which means that baby joseph would likely die very soon thereafter. the family has argued if they give the baby the tracheotomy, he will live longer and he can die "on god's time," they say. eight years ago, the family had a daughter with the same brain disease. she was given a tracheotomy. she did live longer. the hospital calls the tracheotomy, which is a surgically implanted tube in the baby's throat, invasive and that it will do nothing but prolong the misery for this child. the judge has ruled in favor of the hospital, ordering the parents to give consent to hav
official reporting it could be a 1 in 100-year storm. trace gallagher has the latest. >> reporter: here's the problem, megyn, you have waterways that are swollen and ground that's saturated, so when the rain comes down, the water hits and runs and you have surges into the rivers and that dangerous flash flooding is created. the storm that's battering the northeast has hammered the south and the midwest. look down in alabama. it's the alabama double whammy, if you will. they have tornadoes down there that cause wide stretches of damage, but torrential rains as well and major flooding all across alabama and parts of the south. as you move up toward kentucky, tennessee, ohio, the ohio river is nearly 2 feet above flood stage. that's still in alabama. you move up, the experts expect it to rise at least two more feet in coming days. cincinnati, by the way, has shut down schools and this storm will get worse. you move further north and east toward new jersey and new york, take a look at this. they're expecting three more inches of rain in new jersey and parts of new york. that's after that co
coastal towns. trace gallagher joins us with more on that. in california, what have they said? >> reporter: we are an hour away from the first wave of the tsunami possibly hitting the west coast. we are under a tsunami advisory in southern california. northern california and oregon and the washington coast her in tsunami warnings. the beaches in orange county have been shut down. in los angeles county they have not shut the beaches down. they are watching and waiting. an hour from now we should see the effects. the island of kauai in hawaii has already seen a tsunami wave, it was 1-2 feet. this is from the island of oahu. this is waikiki beach. we have been watching this water recede. then it comes back in slowly again. then it recedes. we have seen that two or three times. what you cannot see in the frame is there are people walking up and down the beach in waikiki. remember they have done that vertical evacuation sending all the people in the hotels up to the higher floors. oahu is feeling the effects and it will go down the line, down to maui and the big island of hawaii should begin fe
for missing victims trapped under debris. trace gallagher monitoring all of this. >> reporter: the pictures are unlike anything we've seen. we've talked about the death toll. it may be weeks before we get the idea of the death toll. look at this. this is in tokyo. [sounds muc of crashing] >> reporter: it lasts for more than a minute. hundreds of miles away from the epicenter. the earthquake also caused a 30-foot tsunami. a massive wall of water filled with mud and debris and cars. that tsunami wave pushed three miles inland, going 500 miles an hour. you know the debris inside the water is ever about it as dangerous as the water itself. in the asian tsunami most of the victims died of blunt trauma because of the debris. 300 bodies have been found in sendai alone. 500 more are missing. a ferry boat with 100 passengers is missing. a train with passengers is missing. there are hundreds of fires burning. you touched on that nuclear power plant. 3,000 people have been evacuated from that nuk jar power plant. from around that area because the labor minister says there is a possibility of a radiati
submit of the riding. >> my name is philip gallagher. on a residential apartment manager. there are not many landlords here today and i live that market and castro. i don't see our supervisor here, but -- i have a 75-year-old tenant resident in the building on the top floor, corner unit. she has no guests for visitors and she's got bedbugs. i just want to put it out there that it happens in all neighborhoods and they are on their way. i have a great landlord. he could not be better on a lot of different levels, but he is uneducated on this issue. i know more about bedbugs as a residential manager and the older woman got infested with bedbugs. now that i have become educated, i did not know how to respond. the first thing the manager said was get the mattress out of the unit which is the absolute worst thing you can do, to remove any furniture or the mattress. i did what the landlord told me to do. i got the mattress out and that spreads the bedbugs into the hallways, elevators and all common areas of the building. eventually -- it's also important not only for landlord ed
disaster. alicia acuna at the earthquake center. and first, trace gallagher. japan continuing to get rocked. >> reporter: since the 8.9 earthquake, they have been struck with three major aftershocks and two were stronger than the san francisco earthquake in 1989. i want to show you video inside a grocery store. this will give you an idea -- this is an office building in tokyo and this will give you an idea how powerful the earthquake was. this is hundreds of miles away from the epicenter. you can see the shaking there. it lasted for more than a minute. the u.s. geological survey says the quake ruptured the earthquake's crust. a chunk 150 miles long and 50 miles wide. in japan, in the northern part of the country whack the earthquake did not level, the tsunami did. that 23-foot liquid monster there. the cars. the homes. and people. caught up in the tsunami. the debris being quite dangerous. we're now told that most of those killed actually died in the tsunami and not the earthquake. the national media says the death toll is above 1,000. that's almost certain to rise. >> shepard: damage tall
and avoid a nuclear melt down, prompting concerns here in the u.s., trace gallagher is live at a nuclear facility in california, trace? >> reporter: and it is a massive nuclear facility, allyson and the concern is it is built on the ocean in a earthquake-prone part of our country. how safe is it? surprising answers, coming up.  - because it's completely invisible. - because it's designed to help me hear better. male announcer: introducing amp, a new kind of hearing aid, so tiny, it's invisible. female announcer: amp is comfortable to wear and easily removable. amp, the hearing aid for people who aren't ready for a hearing aid. male announcer: call: to find an amp hearing professional near you. only $1,500 a pair. alisyn: developing right now in america's news room, four people are recovering after an explosion at a chemical plant, in mriddleton, massachusetts, firefighters from several towns helped put out the flames and u.s. state department spokesman, p. j. crowley calling it quits after the white house caught wind of comments he made, about the pentagon's treatment of private bradle
and void. trace gallagher has an update from our west coast newsroom. t.g. >> reporter: the administration claims they haven't given maine a waiver, but a "temporary adjustment." a key provision of the healthcare law says that insurance companies have to spend 80% to 85% of premiums on patient care. maine spends about 65%. one of the major insurance companies said, we'll pull out of the state because we cannot make a profit. that would have destabilized the market. so now maine gets to stay at that 65% until 2014. bottom line, maine has been made an exception. the administration overall has issued more than 1,000 waivers or adjustments, if you call them. and look, if you will, the pushback from the states since this was enacted one year ago. 33 states have now formed task forces or commissions to study the law. 25 states have joined florida in that legal challenge to the individual mandate, where a district judge ruled the entire thing unconstitutional. and now the administration is appealing. and eight states have enacted laws or passed initiatives opposing certain requirements. one year
francisco when a fire broke out on board. trace gallagher following this one live from our west coast newsroom. trace? >> reporter: 112 people on board at 36,000 feet. the pilot hears a missing sound and flames shoot out at him. he puts out the flames with a fire extinguisher. the flames start over again. a flight attendant grabs one. they make an emergency landing at dulles airport in d.c. and the windshield shatters. the co-pilot has to land the plane. a pilot that flew that same aircraft earlier in the day reported fumes and and overheated electrical connection. he showed the mechanic a charred connector. the pilot told the same mechanic, that plane made an unscheduled stop in vegas the day before because there was smoke in the cockpit. the mechanic told the ntsb investigators that he allowed it to fly because the maintenance manual said that it can fly 50 hours with charred window heater collections. the feds have known for years and years that cockpit windows on some boeing planes have a tendency to catch fire. until now, they've done nothing about it, megyn. prior to this, the a
national attention. trace gallagher has live more in l.a. with the details. hey, trace. >> reporter: the letter was sent to russell pearce, who circulated it to republican members. and right before they were about to consider one out of five immigration bills in arizona, the letter was read aloud by senator lori klein. >> i asked the students way they refused to say the pledge of allegiance. they responded by saying, we're mexicans and americans stole our land. >> reporter: it went on to say, "i have found that substitute teaching in these areas, most of the mexican students don't want to be educated, but rather want to be gangmembers and gangsters. they hate america and are determined to reclaim this area for mexico." well, democratic senator steve gallardo also mentioned in the letter saying, "the regular teacher's instructions were for the students to read a few pages and answer questions regarding mark twain." now senator gallardo and other democrats are trying to question the voracity of the letter. >> it's hard to believe that we would have a class that would act and behave in
safety around the world, including in southern california where our correspondent trace gallagher is standing by live at a plant, well, where the neighbors are somewhat concerned now. trace? >> very concerned, shep. you notice you said those beaker shapes in japan. you look behind me, can you see they are domed shape here. the officials believe that the power plant can handle a magnitude 7 earthquake. they built it like that they based on fault lines in history that the biggest earthquake to strike this area would be 6.5. if that quake was to cause a tsunami. they believed it would be no bigger than 25 feet, so they built this sea wall at 30 feet. if all of those things are wrong and there was a catastrophic event that breached those nuclear reactors, they still believe there is enough redundancy in the system to keep the power on and to keep the reactors cool. listen. >> there are several different trains or redundant component sets of safety related equipment. diesel generators. electrical switch gears. batteries. pumps, motors, valves. >> that said, they are watching the situat
palkot in the city of osaka japan. trace gallagher on the nuclear disaster. take us through each reactor and where things stand in this disaster. >> shep, the number one reactor appears to be stable tonight. the power is back on there the number two reactor the power is back on but there is white smoke coming out. it's unclear where that smoke exactly is coming from. they are trying to work on a ventilation system there. number three is the big concern. heavy black smoke is coming out. the workers have all been evacuated. and there is concern that pressure is building up inside that nuclear reactor. and, remember, number three is the only reactor that uses plutonium, which is much more toxic than uranium. number four, the pool that holds those spent fuel rods still, very, very dry. so radiation is coming out. number five and six, shep, appear to be stable tonight. >> shepard: trace, we know the long history of tepco the tokyo electric power company which own os these plants. we know they have had all sorts of problems. now we are learning that that same company in charge of the plant rep
on jewelry, art and charity including aids research. trace gallagher live in los angeles with more on liz taylor's life. >> after being hospitalized for six weeks today liz taylor died of congestive heart failure. she was surrounded by her four children. she was a star at 12 years old. divorcee at 18 years old and widow at 26. now at 79, she leaves a lasting legacy. >> migrant fairy horse. >> national velvet made her american treasure, black hair, porcelain skin violet eyes. >> mix of beauty and ability. >> almost all greek thing, i'm flattered. >> she was a starlet who stole hearts of many a men. >> pop idol eddie fisher. movie star richard burton, construction worker larry pertensi once said she added scandal. glamour to gossip. >> liz taylor is sun someone we all followed, every scandal, every love affair every new necklace every new ring made news. >> you make me sound just awful. >> highest paid actress of her time. signing the first ever-million-dollar movie deal. true fortune came through lines of jewelry and perfume. at the time of her 17th divorce. her net worth was estimated at
>> welcome back to booktv's live coverage of the 2011 tucson festival of books where the gallagher theatre in university of arizona. in just a moment astronomer stephen strom doug isbell present their thoughts on space and that is moderated by peter smith the principle investigator and project leader for the university of arizona's phoenix mars mission. >> okay, let's get started. today we have a real treat. i think we all understand after wandering around these beautiful exhibits outside and a perfect day that we have today that tucson is a special place not only for the wonderful people that live here, but for the clear skies. so today we have a talk from two special authors, doug isbell and stephen strom that are going to talk about the observatories of the southwest and of course we all know why they are here and we have all been curious i think what goes on in those buildings on top of the mountains that you can see driving down the freeway. so we will start with doug isbell first and then stephen strom will talk and i'm going to try to prod them since this book was published
. trace gallagher with the news live in our west coast news hub this afternoon. if the president of yemen goes away, does united states influence go with him? >> well, most experts say the answer, shep, is yes. because the truth is nobody really knows who would replace the president. in fact, nobody knows who the united states would want to replace the president there. a recent report to congress says and i'm quoting here currently there is no real consensus alternative on president saleh. also consider this, one of the opposition leaders in yemen says that al qaeda was the creation of the is is a la government. another opposition leader is said to be loyal to osama bin laden so if you look across the board, there is not exactly great choices. >> branch of al qaeda for that matter. >> al qaeda on the saudi -- al qaeda on the arabian peninsula, yeah, they are thought to be connected to that almost successful bombing of the cargo jet liners last year as well as the failed christmas day bombing. and the fort hood massacre. yemen is also nearly a failed state. pirates rome the watters. there
and trace gallagher on the west coast helping this afternoon. what do we know about this baby girl, trace. >> reporter: they were going through piles of rubble and heard the cries and rubble tossed around. some rescuers thought they heard a baby and stopped and listened and went on digging and heard it again. and four enough a four month old baby girl, actually wearing a pink wool bear suit and swept out of her parent's arms during the the tsunami and the parents also survived. we're also getting some amazing pictures coming in and this is in the region where 2000 people died, many more are missing. these are three elderly people who were actually trapped inside their car. they were swept away by the tsunami and again, as you see there, they were in a bunch of debris and they were pulled out alive in there more than 20 hours. and four days later, as you showed. a 20-year-old man rescued alive. he said, he, too, had been swept away by the tsunami and he fought it and fought it and then he said he went with it. he was also under a lot of debris when the rescue tooms got to him, a 70-year-o
, that team will play its first post season game without its star player. trace gallagher in our west coast news hub this afternoon. what else do we know about these two cases, trace. >> we can tell you, shep that matthew had already undergone three open heart surgeries the first one when he was years old. suffered from both enlarged heart as well as enlarged ventricles. he took a blow to the chest right before he collapsed. the coroner says that was not the cause. wes leonard on the other hand also died because of enlarged heart but he was never diagnosed. he died after making what you where to see here which was the game-winning lay up. and cock doctors say that most of these student athletes who die of heart failure die because they are not diagnosed and a simple ekg could change that. listen. >> it's a wakeup call to just look at the idea that, you know, your teenager may not have been screened since he was 2 years old. he may not have been seen in years. get your children looked at before they engage in strenuous physical activity. >> and, again, we are not saying that wes leonard woul
be. trace gallagher in our west coast news hub. what does this extension mean? does it mean they are close or anything? >> well, the nfl has been saying for days, shep, that they are willing to push back this deadline as long as there was some progress. so this is a good sign there at least is a little bit of movement though. a player's representative has just said that they are still miles apart. there are reports the owners are willing to give the players unisom more detailed information about the finances. exactly how much money is coming in and where all that money is going, that has been a major sticking point. those who are following these negotiations closely say this extension could be extended. listen. >> we have seen this in every labor negotiation in sports. there is always a deadline. that deadline is never met. and it always extends past that deadline. the deadline means absolutely nothing. so they have time now. there is six months until the season kicks off. >> and there is a good point to say last time these negotiations were extended back in 2006 it worked.
should note cocaine typically stays in the body for three days. trace gallagher with the news live from los angeles. he put himself through home rehab, i understand. >> yeah. he says you really can't call it rehab, shep, because they don't have a license. instead, they call it sober valley lodge where his primary client himself was radically successful. he said he cured himself by closing his eyes and using his mind to make it so. now he says he is done with drugs. but he admits he loves to party. listen. >> i mean, what's not to love? especially when you see how i party. it's epic. the run i was on made sinatra, flynn, jaggers, richards, all of them made them look like droopy eyed armless children. >> he went on to call alcoholic lick's anonymous fiction. >> shepard: troopy eyed armless children. he is on with cbs and warner's brothers right? >> he said they picked a fight with a war lock. by the time he is done, warner brothers is going to be called charlie brothers. today his lawyer sent to both cbs and warner brothers demanding think pay sheen for those eight episodes of two and a h
where they measure such things. first trace gallagher tracking new developments from japan from our west coast news hub. what else do we know about the situation on the ground in the northeast now. >> we can tell you, shep, the after shocks keep on coming. the after shocks 7.1 which is itself a very powerful earthquake. of the 8.9 magnitude quake was so powerful that it tore a hole in the earth's crust 150 miles long and 50 miles wide. the people in northern japan had just 15 minutes between earthquake and tsunami. a wave as you can see there that washed away homes. it washed away lives. and it pushed three miles inland. at day break, we finally got our first look of the aftermath and it was ugly. the buildings that were made of stone, they stood. the buildings that were not did not stand. the water shows no signs of receding, the japanese media says the death toll is now above 1,000, shep. it will likely go much higher, judging from those numbers. >> shepard: parts of japan to shut down entire transportation systems and even now many hours after the quake millions are said to be strande
a nice salary. trace gallagher live in los angeles now. trace, other city leaders will be standing trial but robert rizzo is said to be the ringleader here, right? >> yes, he is, shep. robert rizzo is now charged with 54 felony counts. everything from falsifying documents to misappropriating funds. and prosecutors say several of his final contracts were illegal because he essentially drew them up himself and told the city to pay him. and that he also paid off other city leaders for their loyalty. here's the judge. listen. >> the city officials in bell led by rizzo engaged in what is probably legal lay massive ongoing conspiracy to enrich themselves through what is legally described as an organized appropriation of public money. >> you heard the judge mention angela spochy. she is the former assistant city manager, she, rizzo and two others will now stand trial, shep. >> shepard: all right. tell us about defense strategy here, trace. >> the defense says that robert izzo earned every money he paid because he approved the way the city operated even though the city of bell is one of the poor
. trace gallagher with this story live from our west coast news hub this afternoon. trace, several people really have defied the odds here. >> because you have mile after mile of death and destruction, shep and suddenly the rescue teams find life. i want to show you this video of three elderly people trapped inside their car. they were trapped in the tsunami. the car tumbled over and over. when the water came to a stop. they had the doors jammed by debris. the rescue teams opened the doors, pulled them out alive. a 20-year-old man was also rescued where 2,000 people have died. he was under that debris for four days, pulled out suffering from hypothermia, shep. for every story like that some got other way. >> heart breaking pictures of parents went to the local post office where their son had worked. found the post office, most of it was still standing, they walked around inside and outside. there was no sign of their son. here is the father calling out. listen. we don't have that sound. it was heart rendering though shep. they believe now four days later their son is not coming back. shep
on wall street. long-time fed-watcher tom gallagher says investment pros will look for any instant clarifications reporters can wring from the fed chairman. >> i'm not sure the average person is going to stop what they're doing to tune in to watch the press conference. i think the ability of the fed to say we have press conferences to explain our actions will improve the perception of the fed's accountability to the congress and the public. >> reporter: and that is important. economists argue if the public trusts the fed is doing a good job running the economy, people will be less worried about inflation and they may be less likely to put off big purchases that add to growth. darren gersh, "nightly business report." >> susie: speaking of the fed, one of the fed's most candid policymakers is retiring: kansas city federal reserve bank president thomas hoenig. he will leave his post in october after nearly for decades at the central bank. hoenig is known for arguing against the fed's low interest rate policy warning about the risks of inflation. >> susie: heading off to weekend >> tom
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